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Marguerite Miller, Editor by Marguerite Miller Our questions to date have dealt with the WHY and HOW to INTEGRATE new technology into the piano teaching studio. Beginning with the next issue (Summer, 1991), the questions will relate to actual teaching: WHAT to teach (materials) and HOW to TEACH (strategies) to make the best use of ...
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Martha Appleby, Editor by Martha Appleby We have heard from teachers, students, and composers — discussing their approach to choosing repertoire for early-level study. With this issue we will hear from the individuals who truly put it all together for us, the publishers. Without this group of music editors and publishers, the rest of us ...
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Brenda Dillon, Editor by Brenda Dillon Both responders to this issue’s question make it clear that they both expect and welcome diversity of levels in their teaching. Although it is more apparent in adult classes with a mixture of ages and musical backgrounds, diversity of levels soon becomes apparent in a group of six-year-olds who ...
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Joyce Cameron, Editor by Joyce Cameron The question How do you involve your students in the mood of music? directs attention to essential, yet often intangible, aspects of music performance. The answer requires a clear understanding of the nature of music and of music performance. Without becoming embroiled in long aesthetic arguments, it can be ...
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Marvin Blickenstaff, Editor by Marvin Blickenstaff Aren’t you terribly curious about what really transpires in other teachers’ studios? How do our colleagues across the country teach a particular aspect of theory, or technique? What “facilitations” do they use for teaching certain hurdles in familiar pieces in the repertoire? And how do they convey concepts of ...
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Madeleine Crouch, Editor by Madeleine Crouch Moving your household — furniture, pictures, clothes, records, books — is an unnerving experience at the very least. But moving a piano . . . it conjures up memories of the classic Laurel and Hardy film. Remember? It was Man against Instrument as they struggled to get the hefty ...
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Steven Roberson, Editor by Steven Roberson We asked four very fine teachers, “How do you ensure good posture at the piano, especially in home practice?” All four respondents agreed that correct posture should be taught from the beginning and reinforced always. How many times have we seen students who sit too close to the keyboard, ...
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Richard Chronister, Editor by Richard Chronister The best way to teach piano students to read will probably always be a hotly debated item, and we will continue to explore that subject in this department of KEYBOARD COMPANION. Another controversial subject in this area is the one we deal with in this issue — when to ...
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Elvina Pearce, Editor by Elvina Pearce In this issue, our Home Practice department deals with memorizing. For openers, I don’t subscribe to the theory that pianists necessarily perform better when they play from memory, particularly the traditional, young, inexperienced piano student playing in the once-or twice-a-year recital attended primarily by parents, relatives, and friends. If ...
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